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Written by Peter Carter

September 29, 2014

With just six weeks to go before the start of G20 week, details of exactly what disruptions local businesses and residents can expect to endure are yet to be made public.
The August briefing paper from Queensland Police – that was expected to contain particulars and times of roadway shutdowns – gives the barest details, nothing more than what was already known. Apart from the closure of South Brisbane Station, the convention centre car park and some specified streets in the area, the information made available in the brochure is surprisingly scant.

And a further “update” this week, provided zero additional information.

No details have been made public of “other disruptions to the road network and changes to public transport” that police say can be expected over the period from Friday 7 November when international delegations and media will begin arriving until when the city is expected to regain normal ten days later – peak hour on Monday 17 November.

There is still no hint of what traffic flow through sections of major CBD thoroughfares declared within the highest security “restricted areas”– including Elizabeth, George, Ann, Edward, William, Roma, Adelaide, Margaret, Alice and Queen Streets – will be permitted, when or for how long.

Major hotels where world leaders will be staying have been identified because of the declaration of high security “restricted areas” around them, but the preferred motorcade routes that will crisscross the inner city are being kept secret. Either that or nobody knows what to say.

Even the motorcade route expected to gain the greatest patronage for transfers of delegations – the routes between Brisbane International Airport and the CBD – are yet to be publicized.

Sure, the legislation allows motorcade routes to be declared without any notice at all; but to minimise their inconvenience, inner-city residents and businesses could surely expect to be told well in advance which travel routes are affected.

Categories: G20 , Litigation & Law Practice

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